Environment News

Iowa Legislative update - Feb. 11, 2020

We are now entering the fifth full week of the 2020 legislative session. As legislators, agencies, the governor’s office, and committees have worked to introduce and review legislation, we’ve been engaging with them to make sure rural Iowans have a seat at the table. In all, we have registered for, against, or undecided on 19 bills which relate to water quality, renewable energy, economic development, and more.

As bills are introduced in the next few weeks, I will keep you informed on our lead initiatives and other key legislation we are following. For more updates and questions, or to get involved, please reply to this email or contact me at codys@cfra.org.

Nebraska Unicameral Update - Jan. 28

Today is day 13 of the Nebraska Legislature’s “short,” 60 day session. The 10 day bill introduction window ended on Jan 23. The Legislature is tentatively scheduled to adjourn on April 23, 2020.

Each of the 482 new bills introduced during the second year of the biennium will be heard before one of 14 standing committees between now and Feb 27. There are also 481 carryover bills from 2019 that may be voted out of committee and/or brought to the floor for debate.

Survey: Rural Iowans Want Candidates to Address Climate Change

DES MOINES, Iowa -- As presidential hopefuls make their final pitches to Iowans before the upcoming caucuses, rural residents say they want to hear more about climate change.

Some political observers might think climate change is an issue more important to voters in coastal areas. But according to the Center for Rural Affairs, 91% of respondents to a recent survey said they were either "very" or "extremely" concerned about climate change affecting their lives.

Red Fern Farm builds resiliency through diversification

Tom Wahl and Kathy Dice, owners of Red Fern Farm, have built resiliency in their operation to overcome challenging weather.

Nestled in a heavily wooded area just south of Grandview, Iowa, Red Fern Farm offers a unique experience for customers to harvest their own Iowa-grown fruits and nuts.

The owners grow a variety of fruit and nut trees—including chestnuts, persimmons, heartnut, pawpaw, and Asian pear. Their primary market is a “you pick” business throughout the summer, where customers schedule a time to pick from the trees and pay per pound harvested.

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