Conservation News

Conservation program allows Iowa farmer to make ‘practical changes’ to improve his operation

Like many farmers, Dan Taylor of Dallas County, Iowa, is adjusting to the new reality under coronavirus. Thankfully, his family has not been touched by the virus, and he is moving forward with planting and conservation practices he had planned for this year.

It’s a routine he’s been doing every spring since graduating from high school in 1978 and going right to work after renting 80 acres of land.

He’s been farming ever since, about 9 miles from the farm he grew up on.

Sortum practices stewardship in the Sandhills

Sarah Sortum always hoped to raise her kids on the family ranch in Nebraska’s eastern Sandhills.

She shares this goal with her brother, as the two want to ensure the ranch’s vitality for generations to come.

“At one point, we began to ask ourselves, ‘What do we want the opportunities to be like for our kids and grandkids 50 years from now? What can we do now that will support them then?’” Sarah said.

South Dakota cousins improve pasture management with CSP

For Charlie and Aaron Johnson, family farming takes on a very literal meaning.

The cousins work together alongside Charlie’s brothers, Allan and Kevin, and Charlie’s son, Jordan, to operate a combined nearly 3,000 acres in Madison, South Dakota.

The Johnsons’ operation includes four major crops—corn, oats, soybeans, and alfalfa hay—in a six-year rotation. 

Conservation Stewardship Program application deadline upcoming

The deadline for farmers and ranchers to apply to the Conservation Stewardship Program (CSP) is quickly approaching. Application deadlines vary by state, so interested producers should contact their local Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) office as soon as possible and be aware of new safety procedures in place due to the coronavirus. 

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