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Recent posts by Jordan Rasmussen

Addressing Obesity in Nebraska’s Youth: Water Consumption in Schools

Due to the time young people spend there, schools are a natural location for proactive, cost-effective interventions to reduce obesity. Policy options to do so include more access to no-cost drinking water, education, promotion of water as a substitute for sugary beverages, and inclusion of water fountains and/or water bottle filling stations in new school buildings.

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Can’t make the hearing in Lincoln? 6 steps for weighing in on legislation

Nebraska residents are often referred to as the second house of our unique unicameral legislative system. Recognizing the importance of constituent voices in the legislative process and the long distances some must travel to appear before a legislative committee, rules now allow letters of testimony to be submitted and included as an exhibit in the official hearing record, permitting participation in the process—even if you are not able to travel to Lincoln.

Addressing obesity through school water access

We all know water is essential for life, but the sufficient consumption of water also has long-term health benefits. Increased water consumption has been found to reduce levels of dental decay, positively impact cognition, improve overall eating and physical activity habits, and reduce the risks for obesity.

In Nebraska, where the rate of obesity for high school students and adults both fall in the top quarter of all states, an increase in the consumption of water could help not only waistlines, but the state’s bottom line when it comes to health care costs.

More Than A Smile: An Examination of Rural Dental Health Care in Nebraska

Dental health is essential to overall health. 

Affecting not only physical but mental and emotional well-being, oral health is a critical and complex issue that spans beyond straight teeth and a white smile. While many oral conditions are preventable and treatable if diagnosed early, millions of Americans lack access to preventative services and treatments. These barriers to dental care access are multifaceted, and are often exacerbated for rural residents.

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