Climate

Climate change presents a steep challenge for rural America. Fortunately, rural communities are full of people who are committed to addressing climate change. We strive to support a strong sense of stewardship by supporting common-sense actions to mitigate this global problem which can present dire local impacts for rural America.

Rural, small town, and tribal communities are already experiencing the impacts of climate change and are a critical part of any potential solution. We work alongside rural Americans, small business owners, farmers and ranchers, community leaders, and young people to advocate for measures that address climate change and create new opportunities in rural places.

As we work to reduce carbon emissions, we advocate for investments in renewable energy, more efficient use of energy in our daily lives, and agricultural practices which sequester carbon. Meanwhile, we assist in amplifying the voices of rural Americans so they are heard in national conversations about climate change.

Rural Americans are having the difficult conversations and committing to do their part in addressing climate change, and we’re proud to stand with them.

You can join our #2020ClimateCaucus, and view our climate resources page.

Climate Notes

 

Center for Rural Affairs September and October 2019 newsletter

My favorite part of this job isn’t the cake we get for birthdays, although that is a pretty neat perk.

I absolutely love visiting with you—our donors, event and program participants, small business loan recipients, board members, and everyday, rural people.

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Take the Next Step NPPD!

The coal-fired power plant north of Hallam, Nebraska, Sheldon Station, will undergo a partial transition from coal to an exciting and innovative power generation technology. Nebraska Public Power District (NPPD), which owns and operates the plant, plans to replace one of the existing coal-fired boilers at Sheldon Station plant with one that uses hydrogen fuel. This is great but it’s a ‘job half-done.’

Iowans have a unique opportunity to address rural issues with candidates

This week marks one year until the 2020 general election, in which Americans will select their next president.

For Iowans, this comes as no surprise. Candidates have been campaigning in the state for months in hopes of winning support in the Iowa caucuses. For rural Iowans specifically, the attention provides a unique opportunity to engage the candidates about issues that affect rural areas.

Iowa sixth-graders urge candidates to address our changing climate

In many ways, Jack Spence and Thomas Sauer are normal sixth grade students.

Jack enjoys playing sports, Thomas’ favorite school subject is social studies, and the two boys have been friends since their elementary years.

In recent months, the duo has been advocating for leaders to prioritize our climate on a national political scale. As presidential candidates flood through their hometown ahead of the Iowa caucuses, the boys are making sure candidates hear questions about the changing climate and its impact on rural Iowa, from the youth.

Study shows Iowans want presidential candidates to address climate change

A recent survey indicates a majority of Iowans want presidential candidates to address science-related issues, specifically climate change and energy.

According to the survey, conducted between June 13 and 19 on behalf of Research!America and Science Debate, 79 percent of 802 adult Iowans who responded to the survey would like presidential candidates to have a plan addressing climate change and 87 percent want them to discuss science-related issues.