News

Tribal food sovereignty during COVID-19: education, access, distribution, and resiliency

In many communities across rural America, we are beginning to ease into the new norms and routines of quarantine. Each of us is attending to the impacts of COVID-19 on our friends, families, and communities as we all reflect on these unprecedented times.

Similarly, yet quite distinct, Tribal communities and Indigenous people have been presented with unique challenges across America that many of us may not be familiar with. By taking a closer look at how food sovereignty rebuilds disconnected nutrition systems in Native communities, we can begin to understand how education, access, distribution, and resiliency address intersecting challenges and opportunities in rural Nebraska.

Newspaper owner strives to keep community connected

Norma Cell Marquez had a desire to ensure the Latino community was informed of current events in Nebraska. Her dream was to keep people up to date in Spanish, so no one was left out of the loop on important topics such as health, immigration, nutrition, and education.

She made that dream come true in August 2016 when she took over Buenos Dias Nebraska, an all-Spanish print and digital newspaper based in Grand Island.

Packing plant companies’ actions hurt farmers and workers

The Center for Rural Affairs is committed to helping our local business partners cope with the economic impact of COVID-19. It’s part of our mission to build prosperous, healthy, and inclusive communities. And, it’s the right thing to do.

Long an important part of rural communities, scrutiny on meatpacking plant companies has intensified as a result of the coronavirus pandemic.

Stories of rural resiliency: libraries live on with community support

A source of comfort, a home away from home, a creative outlet, and a place to expand knowledge and enlighten the minds of young and old alike—libraries are some of our most treasured resources.

Since the coronavirus pandemic has led to the closure of businesses of all kinds, rural Americans have missed out on many of the services generally available to them, especially through their local library.

Your View: Think small communities

They may not be big, but small businesses are having a huge impact in your rural community. Yet, when the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security (CARES) Act was signed into law, Congress left them out.

While many businesses, such as retail, restaurants, salons and care providers, have been allowed to reopen amid new restrictions due to coronavirus concerns, small rural business owners with loans through the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Rural Microentrepreneur Assistance Program (RMAP) continue to face challenges, with many worried they may have to close their doors.

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